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Friday, May 15, 2020 | History

1 edition of A list of names of foreigners in Japan in Bakumatsu and early Meiji (1850-1900) found in the catalog.

A list of names of foreigners in Japan in Bakumatsu and early Meiji (1850-1900)

Herman J. Moeshart

A list of names of foreigners in Japan in Bakumatsu and early Meiji (1850-1900)

by Herman J. Moeshart

  • 387 Want to read
  • 14 Currently reading

Published by Batavian Lion International in Amsterdam .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Directories,
  • Aliens,
  • Dutch

  • About the Edition

    The purpose of this list is to provide researchers with some data revealing the "why" and "when" and enabling him/her to identify someone found in documents. Moeshart compiled an extensive database of more than 16.000 records. From this database he generated a list of names of Dutch and other foreigners in Japan 1850-1900 containing c. 2000 names found in the used archives.

    Edition Notes

    Statementcompiled from archives and publications by H.J. Moeshart
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsDS832.7.D8 M64 2010
    The Physical Object
    Pagination296 p. :
    Number of Pages296
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL25306528M
    ISBN 109067076481
    ISBN 109789067076487
    LC Control Number2011522453
    OCLC/WorldCa691853477

      Bridges in early Japan were rare enough, most river crossings being done by ferry, so the existence of one might well work its way into a district or shrine name and the surnames of the local elite.   The story takes place during the early Meiji period in Japan and follows a former assassin from the Bakumatsu, named Himura Kenshin, who becomes a wanderer to protect the people of Japan.

    As a neophyte modern state, Japan had no choice but to resist the great powers, as expressed in the popular Meiji era slogan fukoku kyf hei, ‘a rich country and a strong army.’ ”7 2 Origins of Japanese Wealth and Power 21/10/05 AM Page 2File Size: KB. Photography in Japan is a fascinating visual record of Japanese culture during its metamorphosis from a feudal society to a modern, industrial nation at a time when the art of photography was still in its infancy. The rare and antique photos in this book, most of them published here for the first time, chronicle the introduction of photography in Japan and early Japanese by: 6.

    When Emperor Meiji began his rule in , Japan was a splintered empire, dominated by the shogun and the daimyos, who ruled over the country's more than decentralized domains and who were, in the main, cut off from the outside world, staunchly anti-foreign, and committed to . Start studying World Geography Chapter Geography and heritage of Japan. Learn vocabulary, terms, and more with flashcards, games, and other study tools.


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A list of names of foreigners in Japan in Bakumatsu and early Meiji (1850-1900) by Herman J. Moeshart Download PDF EPUB FB2

Bakumatsu refers to the final years of the Edo period when the Tokugawa shogunate ended. Between andJapan ended its isolationist foreign policy known as sakoku and changed from a feudal Tokugawa shogunate to the modern empire of the Meiji government. The major ideological-political divide during this period was between the pro-imperial nationalists called ishin shishi and the shogunate forces, which included the elite shinsengumi swordsmen.

Journaal van Jonkheer Dirk de Graeff van Polsbroek, belevenissen van een Nederlands diplomaat in het negentiende eeuwse Japan by Dirk de Graeff van Polsbroek (Book) 5 editions published in in Dutch and Undetermined and.

16th century. Two Portuguese traders António da Mota and Francisco Zeimoto (Possibly a third named António Peixoto) land on the island of Tanegashima in They are the first documented Europeans to set foot in Japan.; Fernão Mendes Pinto (, Portugal) Claimed to be one of the first Westerners who visited Japan and wrote about the introduction of guns to the Japanese, though the.

Open Library is an open, editable library catalog, building towards a web page for every book ever published. A list of names of foreigners in Japan in Bakumatsu and early Meiji (1 Herman J.

Moeshart1 book Kees Zandvliet, 1 book Bad author - no name, 1 book British-Dutch Maritime History Conference (4th Instituut.

The Bakumatsu period refers to the last decade and a half of Tokugawa rule, and is generally bookmarked by Commodore Perry's visit to Japan and the Meiji Restoration of There is consequently a vast explosion of English-language material on Japan as the official policy of isolation : Haruko Nakamura.

For a convenient overview of the bakumatsu years, see the introduction (“Domestic Disorder, Imperialism, and National Consolidation”) in Anne Walthall and M. William Steele, Politics and Society in Japan’s Meiji Restoration, A Brief History with Documents, (Boston.

Latest part of the Tokugawa era, comprised between the opening of Japan to foreign trade in and the Meiji Restoration in The bakumatsu period is one of the most agitated and romanticized part of Japanese history. It is the age of the last samurai, of intense fighting between the pro-emperor ishin shishi from Satsuma and Choshu and the pro-shogunate Shinsengumi troops.

Its dimensions were several. Meiji Japan held a very special place in the minds of the Confucian reformers of late Ch'ing times.

Japan served to strengthen the students' consciousness of nationality in many ways. Japan made a more positive contribution to Chinese nationalism through by: 3. Meiji Period Globetrotters and the Visualization of Japan Gregory L. ROHE (Aichi Gakuin University) Abstract With the opening of Japan during the Bakumatsu and Meiji periods, travelers poured into the country, eager to experience for themselves a culture that had previously been, until only recently, entirely closed to them.

The Meiji era (明治, Meiji, Japanese pronunciation: [meꜜː(d)ʑi]) is an era of Japanese history which extended from Octo to J This era represents the first half of the Empire of Japan, during which period the Japanese people moved from being an isolated feudal society at risk of colonisation by European powers to the new paradigm of a modern, industrialised nation.

This page is currently inactive and is retained for historical reference. Either the page is no longer relevant or consensus on its purpose has become unclear. To revive discussion, seek broader input via a forum such as the village pump.

For more info please see Wikipedia:Village pump (technical)/Archive #Suppress rendering of Template:Wikipedia books. Foreign Influence and the Transformation of Early Modern Japan YAYORI TAKANO The Meiji Restoration of is known as one of the great turning points in Japanese history.

An event unique to Japan, it was the Meiji Restoration that set Japan apart developmentally from its Asian Size: KB. Dr H.J. Moeshart, A List of Names of Foreigners in Japan in Bakumatsu and early Meiji () (Amsterdam ) p Dr.

H.J. Moeshart 'Dirk de Graeff and the Opening of Japan' (Batavian Lion International, Amsterdam, ). bakufu gave it a new name and a different location in Edo. Many of the scholars at the Bansho Shirabesho, although minor officials of the bakufu, played important roles as bureaucrats, scholars, and educational leaders during the Bakumatsu-Meiji Period.

In light of its vital role in the translation of Western materials and the establishment of aFile Size: 1MB. The Meiji Restoration (明治維新 Meiji Ishin) is the collective name for the events that restored imperial rule to Japan in The Restoration led to enormous changes in Japan's political and social structure, and spanned both the late Edo period (often called Late Tokugawa shogunate) and the beginning of the Meiji Era, as the country was opened to the rest of the world.

The name Meiji means _____. Enlightened rule. In Julya fleet of _____ ships arrived in Japan's Edo Bay, demanding trading rights. Wrong: British. Which of the following were slogans in Meiji Japan. "Civilization and Enlightenment" "Encourage Industry".

Emperor Meiji (明治天皇, Meiji-tennō, 3 November – 30 July ), also called Meiji the Great (明治大帝, Meiji-taitei), or Meiji the Good (明治聖帝, Meiji-seitei), was the nd Emperor of Japan according to the traditional order of succession, reigning from 3 February until his death on 30 July He presided over the Meiji era, a time of rapid change that witnessed Father: Emperor Kōmei.

List of Contributors x Introduction Ian Nish 1 1 America 15 January–6 August Alistair Swale 7 2 Britain 17 August–16 December [1] Early Meiji Travel Encounters Andrew Cobbing 24 [2] The Mission’s Aims, Objectives & Results Ian Ruxton 35 3 France 16 December –17 February15–20 July Richard Sims 45 4 Belgium   The meiji period (–) in Japanese history is known traditionally as an era of bustling reform during which the leaders of the restored imperial government sought to discard a feudal and backward civilization and to replace it with the modernity of the by: provided Japan a form of constitutional monarchy based on the Prusso-German model, in which the Emperor of Japan was an active ruler and wielded considerable political power (over foreign policy and diplomacy) which was shared with an elected Diet.

The following Meiji Period () was marked by Japan's opening to the West and the establishment of a strong centralized government. Reform, or Renewal, was a chain of events that restored practical imperial rule to Japan in under Emperor Meiji.The Marquis Inoue Kaoru (井上 馨, Janu – September 1, ), GCMG was a Japanese politician and a prominent member of the Meiji oligarchy during the Meiji period of the Empire of one of the senior statesmen in Japan during that period, he had a tremendous influence on the selection of the nation's leaders and formation of its : JanuYuda, Chōshū Domain, Japan.This book gives a great overview of the facts about Sakamoto Ryoma's life, Nakaoka Shintaro's life and the Meiji Restoration.

I feel like this would be a great supplement for fact checking for anyone who read Shiba Ryotaro's Ryoma ga yuku, however, those books still have yet to be translated/5.